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 RIVERA Questions for the Third Exam

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jimenez



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Join date : 2008-11-25

PostSubject: RIVERA Questions for the Third Exam   Sun Mar 29, 2009 11:50 pm

Rivera
Rivera
1. Why is “freedom” (or the idea that we are free) a fundamental requirement in/for morality?Do you see any “parallelism” between Kantian ethics and Existentialism with regards to the conception of freedom in each? Why or why not? What are the similarities or the differences?

2. After careful considerations of the various ethical theories/views we discussed, what “personal moral system or code” can you come up with and which you can adopt? Be sure to talk about the values, precepts/ideas, and other elements that should comprise this “personal moral system or code”. Include your conception of freedom and accountability in this given moral system and your view of what it means to be a moral individual
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rivera



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PostSubject: Re: RIVERA Questions for the Third Exam   Mon Mar 30, 2009 9:29 pm

1. Why is “freedom” (or the idea that is free) a fundamental requirement in/for morality?Do you see any “parallelism” between Kantian ethics and Existentialism with regards to the conception of freedom in each? Why or why not? What are the similarities or the differences?

(a) Freedom is very necessary in/for morality because I believe that we are all free by default and morality takes its place afterwards. Changes and varieties with regards to freedom only happen the moment we decide to follow/observe specific beliefs and ideas. In my opinion, the very act of disregarding freedom already violates one’s personal morality.

(b) Yes, a “parallelism” between Kantian ethics and Existentialism with regards to the conception of freedom exists. As I understood it, both ethical systems recognize the fact that we all have freedom, that we have the capacity to make our own actions and decisions, and that we take hold of the very freedom that each of us have. Although Kant provided us with guidelines, still, he allows us to practice freedom by letting us find our way, deal with our situation, and make the most out of what we have. On the other hand, existentialism tells us that we (as human beings), in the same way with the Kantian Ethics, are free to choose what to make of ourselves. Moreover, we are responsible in choosing for our own course of action and we create and live out our own meaning and interpretation. In the words of Sartre (1947), we are condemned to be free. Condemned because we did not create our own self and free because after being thrown into this world, we are responsible for everything we do.
Also, both ethical systems do not believe that human beings are defined to live out a blueprint. Although each may be guided with different principles (at least to Kantian ethics and existentialism), still, both recognizes the fact that our lives will be shaped by the decisions and actions that we make. Lastly, a parallelism exists between the two for both ethical systems recognize the importance of responsibility (with regards to the actions done and decisions made) in making use of the freedom that we all have.


2. After careful considerations of the various ethical theories/views we discussed, what “personal moral system or code” can you come up with and which you can adopt? Be sure to talk about the values, precepts/ideas, and other elements that should comprise this “personal moral system or code”. Include your conception of freedom and accountability in this given moral system and your view of what it means to be a moral individual

THE RIVERA MORAL SYSTEM [A combination of the DCT, Kantian Ethics, and my beliefs SmileSmile ]

BASIC ELEMENTS/IDEAS/VALUES:

God’s existence as the highest Being
In my personal moral system, God’s existence always comes first. The existence of God explains the existence of the world. Without Him, we will not be here. God is He who created the world. He is the one who makes all things possible. The One who is capable of doing great miracles. The One who sent His One and only Son to save the people who are all part of an imperfect and sinful world. The same world who became sinful because of their (people/man) own wrong doings.

“For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believe in Him shall not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16)


Morality
Morality is something that comes from within; however, should be properly guided by the will of God and the Bible. If we will stop at morality being anything that comes from within, it will be very difficult because, basically, anything can be considered moral. It is important to note here that God provided us with His “grand design/ prefect will” that will serve as guidelines in living a moral life. By guidelines, I meant that this “grand design” is not imposed on us. It is really up to us if we will live by it or not. Also, morality is something that we can discern through the teachings of the Bible and our personal relationship with God.

Jesus said, “. . . I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.” (John 10:10b)

- a verse which shows that God really desires that we have an abundant life (Grand design)


God's unconditional love
God, being the highest and most powerful being that He is, loves us so much that even if He has the capacity to just make us all like robots who are to follow everything and anything that He is to say, He didn’t. Instead, He gave us the free will. The very free will that we have to decide on our own. Initially, God would want all of us to have an abundant life, but He does not want us to be like, just confined in a box and so He came up with this concept of free will. The sad part is that sometimes, if not always, humans tend to use this free will as an excuse to do wrong things and make whimsical decisions. To avoid this, let us consider the next point.

“Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with him, and he with Me.” (Revelation 3:20)
-Jesus Christ is not forcing himself on us. He's allowing us to decide on whether or not we will accpt Him


Freedom, responsibility, and accountability
Freedom will not be effective and fruitful with the concepts of responsibility, accountability and autonomy. Just like the famous quote, “With great power comes great responsibility,” freedom also comes with responsibility. Freedom does not just stop at the notion of being free, but it works hand in hand with responsibility. God did not give us freedom to make decisions that will harm us. Instead, He expects us to be responsible for every decision that we are to take. Furthermore, He expects us to do principled and well-guided actions that we can discern through His Word (The Bible) and/or through our personal relationship with Him (quiet times in prayer, reading and studying the Bible etc.). Aside from being responsible in making decisions and doing things, also, we must be recognizing our accountability to our actions. In times of failure, we must not put the blame on God or His word, for by being accountable it means that we have the obligation to bear the consequences for the said shortcoming.

Autonomy
With the freedom that we have, we should be able to come up with standards that we can make and, at the same time follow. God gave us the free will and the capacity to make a change, a change that He expects to be both for His good and our good. Just like how Christ set an example, we, too, should set a good example for others to follow.
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