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Philo 171
 
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 DELA CRUZ Questions for the Third Exam

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jimenez



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Join date : 2008-11-25

PostSubject: DELA CRUZ Questions for the Third Exam   Sun Mar 29, 2009 11:25 pm

Dela Cruz
Dela Cruz
1. Do we have the right to die? Is it a 'right'? What are the implications of this right, or of the absence thereof?

2. After careful considerations of the various ethical theories/views we discussed, what “personal moral system or code” can you come up with and which you can adopt? Be sure to talk about the values, precepts/ideas, and other elements that should comprise this “personal moral system or code”. Include your conception of freedom and accountability in this given moral system and your view of what it means to be a moral individual.
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delacruzjpe



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PostSubject: answer to third exam   Mon Mar 30, 2009 9:21 pm

1. Do we have the right to die? Is it a 'right'? What are the implications of this right, or of the absence thereof?

I personally espouse on the idea that all people have the inalienable right to live, and in so being, we are entrusted with the responsibility to make the lives that we have truly worth living. This entails a greater sense of compassion and accountability to one’s self; safeguarding our bodies from all forms of physical harm, and preserving our spirits from the corruption that this world could bring. And it goes without further argument that we do not have the exact right to die, simply because we have the innate right to live.

Although modernist ethics would point out that man can avail of his/her reasoning faculties in order to justify whatever decision he/she will have to make, including the issue of taking one’s life. Promoters of this thought would say that Incidences like the possibility of losing a “bright future” as a consequence of a serious illness, the only viable option to end one’s suffering, or even just a “mood swing” of choosing to die, is considered acceptable based on the precepts of freedom and rational thinking. However, this doesn’t make dying a right in itself, but only an option that can be weaved as a product of the conditions imposed on the person. Point blank, dying is a choice that can be influenced by outside forces, e.g. medical conditions, and not as a package by nature that we can just pull out of the box whenever we want to use it.

Dying will always be part of the natural process of human existence – should be viewed as a colourful and joyful culmination of human living. By setting the right purpose/s, we will never outgrow the feeling and need of being alive, of being fulfilled in the presence of the people whom we share our happiness with. Dying will come in passing, and all we have to do is to make the lives that we have worth the “ending” and the applause.

2. After careful considerations of the various ethical theories/views we discussed, what “personal moral system or code” can you come up with and which you can adopt? Be sure to talk about the values, precepts/ideas, and other elements that should comprise this “personal moral system or code”. Include your conception of freedom and accountability in this given moral system and your view of what it means to be a moral individual.

As mentioned in class, it will always be difficult for us to side with a specific moral or ethical theory that can be applied at every circumstance in our lives, for each of these views possess their own strengths and weaknesses. But asked to come up with a “personal moral system or code” is a good way of “taking a dose” of all these ethical theories and be rolled into one super pill that can actually respond to any moral deviance.

I am inclined to believe in what John Stuart Mill’s proposition points out, specifically, that of being an “enlightened utilitarian.” People, by nature, actually seek for what is good for them and tend to avoid whatever causes pain or discomfort. In this sense, Mill argued that we need to identify the highest form of pleasure for us in order to maximize happiness over pain. I think that there will never be a uniform happiness for all people – whatever that would be, foreseeing the possible consequences of that choice matters. In addition, I may adopt the precepts of existentialist ethics which presupposes that in whatever way we perceive the events taking place in our lives, be it the ultimate happiness that we seek to find, we should hold ourselves accountable. We are the welders of our fate, the builders of our own kingdom of ends. As such, no other entities can be blamed with the effects of the decision or choice we will be making – only you and I will be held responsible for your and my whims. Freedom in making the choice of whatever that makes one happy is likewise accompanied by utmost responsibility, making the right and appropriate prioritizations.

At the end of the day, all the ethical and moral theories that have been discussed point out to one important lesson – freedom in making our choices, be it to follow existing moral standards or following our own codes, is always accompanied by responsibility and accountability. Indeed, we can will how our lives would proceed, but we are reminded of the law of interactions which states that for every action there is equal or opposite reaction. We must be able to foresee the aftermath of every choice we will be making, specially in the pursuit of what will make us happy and contented.
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