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 NOMBRADO Questions for the Third Exam

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jimenez



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Join date : 2008-11-25

PostSubject: NOMBRADO Questions for the Third Exam   Sun Mar 29, 2009 11:30 pm

Nombrado
Nombrado:
1. Do we have the right to die? Is it a 'right'? What are the implications of this right, or of the absence thereof?


2. After careful considerations of the various ethical theories/views we discussed, what “personal moral system or code” can you come up with and which you can adopt? Be sure to talk about the values, precepts/ideas, and other elements that should comprise this “personal moral system or code”. Include your conception of freedom and accountability in this given moral system and your view of what it means to be a moral individual.
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nombrado



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PostSubject: Answers to questions #1 and #2   Mon Mar 30, 2009 9:02 pm

1. Do we have the right to die? Is it a 'right'? What are the implications of this right, or of the oabsence thereof?

The issue relating to the right to die includes whether an individual should choose to continue living with the aid of a life support, or if he/she is in a state unable to prevent nearing death should resort to committing suicide. This concept of having the decision to take his own life before death arrives is called “dying the dignity”.

The right to die is also associated with the people around the person nearing death. It is to them that the person wishes to allow him/her to die, if for example the situation suggests that recovery is unlikely to happen. The “Five Wishes” document allows a person to state in advance the priorities and values they wish to have honored at the end of life. For example, if the person wishes how comfortable he/she wants to be, how people should know or what he/she wants them to know about his/her condition, etc.

This I believe is a right which everybody should recognize. Practically speaking, it gives us a sense of dignity right when we are nearing death and relieves us from further suffering. It also calls for the respect the person wants to have whenever he faces other people, that he/she is not going to die helpless, and that he/she is going to die with some control on how he/she will be when it is going to happen, for example, comfort, people informed, etc. This is contained in the Five Wishes document.

When we take away this right, we simply ignore the respect each and everyone of us deserves of choosing how we want to be before we die. We may not have any control on when our lives are going to end, but we certainly deserve to be able to end it with dignity.

2. After careful considerations of the various ethical theories/views we discussed, what “personal moral system or code” can you come up with and which you can adopt? Be sure to talk the values, precepts/ideas, and other elements that should comprise this “personal moral system or code”. Include your conception of freedom and accountability in this given moral system and your view of what it means to be a moral individual.

I would not be choosing a single ethical theory but I would be adopting a mix of Utilitarianism and Existentialism.

In Utilitarianism, it covers the circumstances with focus on the consequences. Whether an action is morally right or wrong depends entirely on its consequences. An action is right if it brings about the best outcome of the choices available. Otherwise it is wrong. Utilitarians basically tell us that actions are good if it brings the best good, when utility is maximized. They define the good as our goals, things, and our pursuits. It is pleasure without pain.

Existential philosophy is characterized by what has been called the "explicit conceptual manifestation of an existential attitude” that begins with a sense of disorientation and confusion in the face of an apparently meaningless or absurd world. But how do we reconcile this with Utilitarianism? In existence precedes essence, it was taught to us that the entire life of the individual constitutes of his essence. Yes, the world is absurd and it has no meaning, until we realize our happiness and seek for it. And so we act to do good, that which makes us most happy, for if not, life would have no meaning.

The relationship of freedom and responsibility is interdependent. In accordance to the moral system I believe in, should be accompanied by the values we believe in. Otherwise, we simply deny ourselves of the freedom that we have. We also remember that we are living in this world, and our freedom is restricted by it. In this morality, freedom will always be associated with the responsibility of the consequences of our actions as well as the values we hold.
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